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ARCHIVE Global Indigenous Peoples Village 2018

Global Indigenous Peoples Village

 

At WorldFest, it is our mission as a celebration of the World Culture to honor the indigenous peoples of the world and the expansive knowledge and cultural richness that are held within them.

Join us in celebrating the 10th annual Global Indigenous Peoples Village at WorldFest!

 

The Global Indigenous Peoples Village is hosted by a diverse range of Indigenous Peoples including the Indigenous Nisenan People of Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, and Sacramento counties, whose land holds the WorldFest gathering. The Nisenan Tribes will open WorldFest on Thursday evening, with a ceremonial welcoming of all guests of WorldFest on their ancestral homelands.

 

The Global Village holds a diverse variety of Indigenous Artisans, Musicians, Dancers, Wisdom Keepers, and Workshops to honor the past and recognize the indigenous peoples’ invaluable contribution to humanity’s cultural diversity and heritage.

 

During the festival, day break will begin with a ceremonial sun welcoming and continue with community gathering all day long.

 

Stay tuned for scheduling of workshops and presentations within the Global Village, and make sure to check out the schedule of the Global Stage which is dedicated to showcasing Indigenous Peoples music and dance as well as lectures from Elders within the community.

 

It is a honor to receive these teachings and share them with the greater WorldFest community. Join us in the Indigenous Global Peoples Village at the festival this year!

 

Global Indigenous Peoples Village at the California Worldfest

Join us next week, July 12-15, in Grass Valley for the Global Indigenous Peoples Village at the 22nd Annual California WorldFest. Come dance & sing, browse handmade art & crafts, listen to stories, and more. See you there! #MusicConnectsUsAll #caWorldfest

Special thanks to the organizers and staff at the Worldfest for putting on such a great event as well as Mignon Geli and Anna Kastner for their efforts coordinating the Village.

Video filmed & edited by Trenton T Branson.

Posted by Trenton Branson Photography on Thursday, July 6, 2017

 

PERFORMERS

Bear Fox & Kontate’ken’okòn:’a
Feather River Singers
Pamela Ames
Huayllipacha
Indigenous Soul Rising
Kimberly ShiningStar
Little Thunder
Neena McNair Family Drum

Southern California Mexica Dancers
Soul-A-Mente
Wakan Waci Blindman
Eddie Madril
Chief Caleen Sisk, Winnemem Wintu
Sacramento Powwow Dance Group

 

 


Bear Fox & Kontate’ken’okòn:’a

The Ahkwesasne Women Singers were formed in 1999 by four inspired, and inspiring women; Bear Fox, Katsitsionni Fox, Elizabeth Nanitcoke and Iawentas Nanticoke. They were driven by the need to protect and preserve the Kanienkeha (Mohawk Language), traditional Kanienkeha:ka (Mohawk People) customs and stories, as well as the oral traditions that are passed down from grandmother to grand-daughter. They believe that songs are the easiest way to pass on language and culture to future generations. Blessed with beautiful singing voices, the women put their talents and their messages together to form a group that would write and perform traditional Kanienkeha:ka songs. Since their inception, the Ahkwesahsne Women Singers have brought their beautiful and powerful music to the community of Ahkwesasne.

 

Members of group are in various stages of life – grandmothers, mothers, aunts, daughters, sisters and cousins. They are teachers, environmental researchers, social workers and students. They take time out of their personal and professional lives to assist their community and volunteer for fundraising activities.

 

Aside from singing Haudenosaunee social songs, some members of Kontiwennenhawi are song writers. They work with Elders and fluent speakers from Ahkwesahsne to ensure the correct usage and spelling of words. The songs contain their own messages that they believe are important for the Mohawk people to know and remember. Their songs honor our Elders, Kanienkehaka teachers, Mother Earth, Grandmother Moon, and Grandfather Thunder. Kontiwennenhawi is committed to continuing the traditions of our ancestors and preserving our language and culture through their beautiful songs and inspiring efforts.

BEAR FOX

I always loved music, and I realized later that I had a gift for songwriting around the age of 29. When I look back and think about it, I always had this beautiful gift, but I didn’t realize what I had. I remember when I was riding the bus to school I could hear music coming to me. I look around and there was no radio playing. It was a melody coming that only I could hear. So I would hum the melody I was hearing. As I got older, I first began writing songs that were in Mohawk for our Traditional Women’s singing group called, ‘Kontiwennenhawi’, (Carriers of the Words). In 2001 my family had a house fire. After this house fire, my family was going through tough times trying to pay bills and trying to put money aside to build a house. One day, I got the idea that I should try and write songs in English. I can write songs in Mohawk maybe I can write songs in English too. The first song that I wrote in English was, ‘Broken.’ The second song that came to me to write was called, ‘Rich Girl.’ So, these are the beginnings of songwriting and singing for me. I began making CDs, and it helps to have them to make ends meet.

 

When I write a song, I run it by my family first. I have five children; I have one girl and four boys. My husband is an Iron Worker. I remember when I sang them ‘Rich Girl’ for the first time—my kids loved it. It made my daughter cry. When my husband heard it, he loved it, too. I remember he had me sit in the car with him. He had me practice the song. Over and over he had me sing the song to him. He wanted me to memorize it without using the paper. I must have sung it about 100 times in a row that night…”

 


Feather River Singers

 

“The vocals are powerful, the drumming solid and the melodies, ear-catching. Make no mistake, these ladies can sing!” – Whispering Wind Magazine

 

This women’s Native American group thrills with soulful singing in Cherokee, English and other Native languages. Kathleen Shain, Anna Eyre and Pamela Ames have sung together for 17 plus years.

 

Feather River Singers is a Women’s Drum with exciting energy, a soothing beat and songs in Cherokee and English. Dedicated to preserving native language through songs, all original materials by group members their 2005 debut CD “Daughters of the Earth” by Feather River Singers broke into new musical territory. The group received a nomination in 2006 for Debut Artist of the Year by the Native American Music Awards (NAMMYS). Current members are Kathleen Shain, Anna Eyre, Pamela Ames, all born in California.

 

www.facebook.com/Feather-River-Singers-144896795603827/

www.store.cdbaby.com/Artist/FeatherRiverSingers


Pamela Ames

 

A powerful voice engages the listener and workshop participants, helping people connect with their inner musician. Her goal is to empower people to experience the joy and healing in music. “Soulful singing” attributed to Pamela Ames, a lead singer for Feather River Singers for over 17 years. Ames is also a singer/songwriter/composer in jazz, Native American Contemporary and electronic music.

 

Workshop: Native Healing Song

 

“When you sing, you pray double.” Teja saying. Come experience singing and drumming Native American songs with Pamela Ames and Feather River Singers members Anna Eyre and Kathleen Shain. The energy and good intentions of Native Song re-energize and uplift. Learn basic pow wow drum protocol at the drum.

 

 


Huayllipacha

 

Huayllipacha (Why-Lee-Pacha) was conceived in 1987 in Peru. It was established in Northern California in 1994 by the Peruvian brothers Salazar Quispe. As a tribute to their culture and with respect for their ancestors, they named their group in the ancient tongue of Inca-Quechua. Meaning “Singing to the Earth,” it is in this spirit that their music is offered.

 

Huayllipacha’s priority is to maintain the traditional Andean Music. They are dedicated to spread the Andean musical art in honor of their ancestors and never allow it to perish for the love that they have for the South American indigenous culture.

 

In addition, over the years, they have expanded their style to include traditional and contemporary music of the Andes, as well as flavors from other regions in South America and around the world including rock and pop hits. Truly a cultural treasure- one listen to Huayllipacha will sweep you away to the Peruvian highlands.

 

www.musicoftheandes.com
www.facebook.com/Huayllipacha


 

Indigenous Soul Rising

 

Native flute fusion meets Visionary folk and soul.

 

Chonie Vargas is a California Native with wild music roots that inspire and speak truth. Mother Nature paired with her Ancestral lineage of Chiricahua Apache and Latin heritage, awoke her to practicing music as medicine. Very original. A visionary folk artist with strong rhythm and acoustic soul.

 

Mignon Geli was born in San Francisco, of Waray, Ilongo, Spanish and Maya ancestry. For the past 18 years has been living in the California sierra foothills by the town of Coloma and the south fork of the American River, in Nisenan-Maidu country. She taught herself to play the Native American style wood flute after her son gifted her with one 13 years ago. Besides composing her own music, she can flute along in many genres from traditional to contemporary Native American (north and south), as well as soul, folk, rock, jazz, funk, blues, etc. Her musicality was influenced by her older brothers who were multi-instrumentalists, singers and songwriters, and many others. When not playing solo flute or drum, she often collaborates with like-minded musicians at festivals, events and gatherings. She is also a radio broadcaster on KFOK Community Radio in Georgetown hosting “Indigenous Soul” since 2007.

 

www.facebook.com/chonievargasmusic
www.facebook.com/geli.soulsis7
www.store.cdbaby.com/cd/mignongeli
www.chonievargas.bandcamp.com/releases
www.m.soundcloud.com/ascension-13


Kimberly ShiningStar

 

Keeping the Culture is an honor and an obligation. There was a time when the stories told the history of the land, the plants, and the animals.

 

Kimberly ShiningStar weaves stories of inherent responsibilities with traditional ecological knowledge. The stories are mesmerizing, told in old time fashion. The experience may awaken your very soul. Genetic memories tingle when they hear the truth.

 

Descending from the Tume’lay Nisenan Miwok, a true California Native, Kimberly ShiningStar is known as “The Storyteller” and a “Culture Keeper”.

 


Little Thunder

 

Cheryl Angel is a member of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate or Rosebud Sioux Tribe of South Dakota. A front line opponent of the pipelines threatening native homelands across America, Cheryl is a strong advocate for environmental justice and indigenous rights. She spent the recent fall-winter season at the Sacred Stone Camp of Standing Rock and will share her experiences within the soothing ambiance of a Lakota wacipi (dance).

 

Karen K Little Thunder is also a member of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate. She is a proud graduate of Sinte Gleska University and a descendant of the University’s namesake and historical Sicangu leader, Spotted Tail. As a bloodline descendant of Little Thunder, Spotted Tail, and Crow Dog, Karen is helpful to the continuation of Sicangu Lakota ancestral knowledge and language by sharing her personal experiences in growth, recovery, and cultural reparations.

 

Cheryl and Karen are traditional dancers of the Sicangu Lakota wacipi and each speaks from the heart in defense of their homelands and indigenous rights. They are mothers and grandmothers, earth protectors and maske (sister-friends), who live and breathe their ancestral responsibilities on a daily basis. Join them in celebrating Mni Wiconi and their continuing advocacy for environmental justice. Revel in the Circle of Life and hear from these vibrant Lakota winyan (women) the latest about the #NoDAPL and #NoKXL movements of the Great Plains region. Water is Life. MNI WICONI.

 

https://www.facebook.com/N8ivGipZ
www.facebook.com/karen.k.littlethunder

 


Neena McNair Family Drum

 

Neena McNair Family Drum originally came together to deepen and strengthen their commitment to the healing that comes through the drum, for all living things.

 

They offer themselves as a conduit for the songs in order to create an interactive space following the nature way. Striving to maintain integrity throughout, with the deepest respect, our intention is to preserve each song’s unique message and sound, so the songs will not be forgotten and people will be reminded of the healing magic that binds all living things.

 


Southern California Mexica Dancers

 

The Southern California Mexica Dancers (meshika) share the traditions of theri ancestors – the Mexica people from the Central Valley of Mexico once known as the great Tenochtitlan.

 

Their Danzas (way of dance) communicates stories and observations of the cosmic and the natural world. During their ceremony participants are invited to join in prayer for healing and restoration.

 

The dancers include Bernice Vasquez and Xochitl Palomera.

 

We are Mexica Dancers, also known as Aztec Dancers. Our danzas allows us to communicate the teachings and stories of our ancestors. Danza synchronizes the mind, body and spirit to the cosmic universe. During our ceremony, we combine the movement, rhythm and songs, Which represent the elements, nature and the cosmos. We invite all walks of life to join in, as we collectively put out our intentions for healing prayers.


Sacramento Powwow Dance Group

The Sacramento Powwow Dance Group has been active in the Northern California area for about 8 years. The group features the southern style of dance & song. The majority of our dancers and singers have been participating in powwow dance their whole lives.

The Group is dedicated to promoting a positive native image through dance. This allows the group to bring native dancing and songs to the general population. The group is committed to educating others on native dance.

The Sacramento Powwow Dance Group has been featured at the following events: California State Fair, Elk Grove Multi-Cultural Festival, Noon Year’s Eve at the Crocker Art Museum, and lastly – part of the half time show at the Sacramento Kings Game. Just to name a few.

The Sacramento Powwow Dance group is led by Shonnie Bear.

We look forward to dancing with you!!

 


Soul-A-Mente

 

Soul-A-Mente is a music duo in California since 2010 with Goodshield Aguilar (Lakota, Pasqua Yaqui) and Mignon Geli (Waray, Ilongo, Maya) offering a variety of original songs, spoken word and consciousness from an Indigenous perspective. They combine native traditional to contemporary music ranging from soul, rock, folk, funk, jazz, reggae and hip hop with guitar, wood flutes, traditional drums, rattles, vocals and native chants.

 

Stay tuned for their soon-to-be released album Soul-A-Mente, Part 2, another musical collaboration by Goodshield and Mignon. Visit the Buffalo Field Campaign website for the fall schedule of the Buffalo Field Campaign Roadshow which begins on the west coast September 13, and ending October 5, 2018 with presentations by co-founder Mike Mease, film documentaries, flute music by Mignon Geli and music by multi-instrumentalist Goodshield Aguilar. Visit www.buffalofieldcampaign.org.

 

Listen to and buy Goodshield’s or Mignon’s music on CD Baby, the independent record store by musicians for musicians. Currently available is Goodshield’s The Fifth World by 7th Generation Rise or Mignon’s Under A Buffalo Sun – Flute Medicine by Mignon Geli.

 

www.cdbaby.com/Artist/7thGenerationRise
www.store.cdbaby.com/cd/mignongeli
www.facebook.com/geli.soulsis7/
www.facebook.com/GoodShieldAguilar7thGenerationRise/
www.goodshieldmusic.com
www.buffalofieldcampaign.org

 


Wakan Waci Blindman

 

Wakan Waci Blindman is a Numu (Northern Paiute) residing on the Pyramid Lake Reservation in Nevada. He also represents the Oglala Lakota Oyate of Pine Ridge, South Dakota. The album ‘Forever Grateful’ is a collective of Native American Church Songs (Peyote Chants) originally composed by him. His unique style is presented with a balance of harmony through sacred instruments and the vocals of all who contributed.

 

www.facebook.com/wakanwaci

 


Eddie Madril

Eddie Madril is a member of the Pascua Yaqui tribe of Southern Arizona and Northern Sonora Mexico. For over 35 years, his involvement and commitment to Native heritage has provided him with the opportunity to share a wealth of information amongst diverse communities. His work has included the presentation of assemblies and residencies in schools and universities across the United States, working with students and encouraging the development of appreciation and respect for American Indian dance, music, culture, and history. He is the founder of Sewam American Indian Dance, a performing arts organization dedicated to Native American arts, education and cultural exchange, bring together both contemporary and traditional native dance and music to produce inspiring and visually stunning presentations.

 

Currently, Eddie teaches American Indian studies and Native American studies at San Francisco State University, College of Marin, and is the Artistic Director for Sewam American Indian Dance. . In addition to his work as a professor of Ethnic Studies/Native American Studies, he is a nationally known speaker on Native American arts and history, presenting at such conferences as academic symposiums in New Zealand (Aotearoa), the Les Culture de Monde Festival in Gannat, France.

 

 

www.sewamdance.com


Chief Caleen Sisk, Winnemem Wintu

 

Caleen Sisk is the Spiritual Leader and Tribal Chief of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe, who practice their traditional culture and ceremonies in their territory along the McCloud River watershed in Northern California.

 

Since assuming leadership responsibilities in 2000, Caleen has focused on maintaining the cultural and religious traditions of the Tribe, and has led the revitalization of the Winnemem’s H’up Chonas (or War Dance) and BaLas Chonas (Puberty Ceremony), which had not been practiced for decades. She advocates for California salmon restoration; healthy, undammed watersheds, and the human right to water. She has received international honors as a tireless sacred site protector, and currently leads the tribe’s resistance against the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s proposal to raise Shasta Dam 18-feet and inundate or damage more than 40 sacred sites.

 

She is also currently leading her Tribe’s efforts to work with Maori and federal fish biologists to return wild Chinook salmon from New Zealand to the McCloud River. In doing so, she advocates for the inclusion of traditional ecological knowledge in federal, state and local environmental research and planning.

 

Caleen is an internationally known speaker on traditional tribal and spiritual issues, having spoken on diverse topics such as spiritual medicine ways, the spirit of water, global warming, sacred sites protection and the responsibility of tribal people to honor their tribal lifeway.

 

Caleen is also a leading voice in raising awareness of the poor human rights conditions suffered by federally unrecognized tribes and unrepresented indigenous peoples around the world. She is a regular speaker at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York where she has campaigned for the U.N. to study the plight of federally unrecognized tribes in the United States. She is also the Spiritual and Environmental Commissioner for ENLACE Continental, an international network of indigenous women.

 

For more than 30 years, Caleen was mentored and taught in traditional healing and Winnemem culture by her late great aunt, Florence Jones, who was the tribe’s spiritual leader for 68 years. Caleen’s traditional teachings and training comes from an unbroken line of leadership of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe.

 

Strongly rooted in her spirituality and her family, Caleen cares deeply for her Winnemem people and for oppressed people around the world.

 

Caleen received her B.A. from Chico State University, CA in 1975, and received her teaching credential from CSU, Chico in 1976.

 

www.winnememwintu.us/caleen-sisk

 

Las Cafeteras

Las Cafeteras

Las Cafeteras have taken the music scene by storm with their infectious live performances and have crossed-genre and musical borders, playing with bands such as Mexican icons Caifanes, Lila Downs, Colombian superstar Juanes, Los Angeles legends Ozomatli, folk/indie favorites Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, and most recently with Talib Kweli.
 

Born and raised east of the Los Angeles river, Las Cafeteras are remixing roots music and telling modern day stories. Las Cafeteras create a vibrant musical fusion with a unique East LA sound and positive message. Their Afro-Mexican beats, rhythms, and rhymes deliver inspiring lyrics that document stories of a community seeking love and justice in the concrete jungle of Los Angeles. Using traditional Son Jarocho instruments like the jarana, requinto, quijada (donkey jawbone) and tarima (a wooden platform), Las Cafeteras sing in English, Spanish, and Spanglish and add a remix of sounds, from rock to hip-hop to rancheras. Las Cafeteras use music as a vehicle to build bridges among different cultures and communities, and create ‘a world where many worlds fit’.
LA Times described Las Cafeteras as “uniquely Angeleno mishmash of punk, hip-hop, beat music, cumbia and rock … live, they’re magnetic.”
 

 

www.lascafeteras.com

Mariachi Herencia de México

Mariachi Herencia de México

Nobody could have anticipated the success of the first album by Mariachi Herencia de México, an ensemble of student musicians from Chicago’s Mexican-American barrios. Released in 2017, their debut album Nuestra Herencia (Our Heritage) received a Latin GRAMMY nomination, attracted local and national news coverage, and created new demand for appearances around the country. Since then, the group has performed in major mariachi festivals in Chicago, Orlando, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Guadalajara, Mexico’s mariachi capital and has made debut performances at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC and Joe’s Pub in New York City.
 
Mariachi Herencia de Mexico Holiday Program:
Celebrate the holidays when Mariachi Herencia de Mexico presents “The Posada: A Christmas Tradition in Mexico.” The Latin GRAMMY nominee will bring the pageantry and excitement of the posada tradition to life, including a re-enactment of Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem and their search for a place to stay. The vibrant concert celebration includes Mexican and American holiday favorites such as: ”Feliz Navidad”, “Los Peces en el Rio,” “Ave Maria,” “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” “Mi Burrito Sabanero,” “Noche de Paz (Silent Night)”, “Jingle Bells”, “O Holy Night”, “The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don’t Be Late),” and much more!
 

 

www.mariachiherenciademexico.com

Toots and The Maytals

Toots and The Maytals

Toots is one of the true architects of reggae – so much so that “Do the Reggae,” a 1968 single by Toots and his group, the Maytals, is credited with giving the genre its name. Classic songs written and recorded by Toots and the Maytals have been covered by the likes of the Clash and the Specials, and the group was featured in reggae’s greatest breakthrough event – “The Harder They Come,” the 1972 film that became an international sensation. The all-star guests on TRUE LOVE range from legends like Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Bonnie Raitt to younger stars including No Doubt, the Roots, and Phish’s Trey Anastasio. The caliber of these collaborators reveals the impact that Toots has had on several generations of rockers and rappers, while appearances from reggae icons Bunny Wailer and Marcia Griffiths show the respect granted to the man who might be the music’s greatest living vocalist. At the heart of it all is that voice – drenched in soul, rooted in gospel, and still breathtakingly powerful after almost four decades in the spotlight.
 


 

www.tootsandthemaytals.org

Trombone Shorty

Trombone Shorty

Trombone Shorty’s new album opens with a dirge, but if you think the beloved bandleader, singer, songwriter and horn-blower born Troy Andrews came here to mourn, you got it all wrong. That bit of beautiful New Orleans soul—”Laveau Dirge No. 1,” named after one of the city’s most famous voodoo queens—shows off our host’s roots before Parking Lot Symphony branches out wildly, wonderfully, funkily across 12 diverse cuts. True to its title, this album contains multitudes of sound—from brass band blare and deep-groove funk, to bluesy beauty and hip-hop/pop swagger—and plenty of emotion all anchored, of course, by stellar playing and the idea that, even in the toughest of times, as Andrews says, “Music brings unity.”

 

 

As for why it’s taken Andrews so long to follow 2013’s Raphael Saadiq-produced Say That to Say This, the man simply says, “I didn’t realize so much time passed. Some artists don’t work until they put a record out but I never stopped going.” Truly. In the last four years, Andrews banked his fifth White House gig; backed Macklemore and Madonna at the Grammys; played on albums by She & Him, Zac Brown, Dierks Bentley, and Mark Ronson; opened tours for Daryl Hall & John Oates and Red Hot Chili Peppers; appeared in Foo Fighters’ Sonic Highways documentary series; voiced the iconic sound of the adult characters in The Peanuts Movie; inherited the esteemed annual fest-closing set at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in the tradition of Crescent City greats like the Neville Brothers and Professor Longhair; and released Trombone Shorty, a children’s book about his life that was named a Caldecott Honor Book in 2016.
 

Adding to that legacy, his Blue Note Records debut Parking Lot Symphony finds Andrews teamed with Grammy-nominated producer Chris Seefried (Andra Day, Fitz and the Tantrums) and an unexpected array of cowriters and players including members of Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, The Meters, Better Than Ezra, and Dumpstaphunk. Considering Andrews’ relentless schedule, it’s all the more surprising that this LP began with him in a room, all alone, back in New Orleans.
 

“I had two weeks at home so I went to the studio and set up the ‘playground,'” he recalls. “I had everything in a circle: tuba, trombone, trumpet, keyboard, Fender Rhodes, Wurly, B3 organ, guitar, bass, drums—and me buried in the middle.” He recorded an album’s worth of ideas and then, well, walked away for a year. Not because he was too busy, but because he wanted to hit the road and see how the music changed on him. When Andrews came back with a full band, the songs came to life.
 

Take the album’s two covers, a pair of NOLA deep cuts: there’s “Here Comes the Girls,” a 1970 Allen Toussaint song originally recorded by Ernie K-Doe that here (with Ivan Neville on piano) sounds bawdy and regal, like something from a current Bruno Mars album; and The Meters’ lovesick “It Ain’t No Use,” which swirls a vintage R&B vibe with resonant choir vocals and upbeat guitar from The Meters’ Leo Nocentelli himself to transport the listener to the center of the jumpingest jazz-soul concert hall that never was.
 

The story there is almost too good. The session band—guitarist Pete Murano, sax men Dan Oestreicher and BK Jackson, and drummer Joey Peebles with Dumpstaphunk’s Tony Hall in for Orleans Avenue bassist Mike Bass-Bailey—were in the studio to lay down “It Ain’t No Use.” Hall even had the vintage acoustic he bought from Nocentelli years ago, which was used on the original Meters session. On the way to the bathroom, Andrews saw Nocentelli coming out of a different tracking room: it was meant to be.
 

But that’s not unusual for a man raised in one of the Tremé’s most musical families. Andrews got his name when he picked up his instrument at four (“My parents pushed me toward trombone because they didn’t need another trumpet player,” he laughs). By eight, he led his own band in parades, halls and even bars: “They’d have to lock the door so the police couldn’t come in.” Promoters would try to hand money to his older cousins, but they’d kindly redirect them to the boy. In his teens, Andrews played shows abroad with the Neville Brothers. Fresh out of high school (New Orleans Center for Creative Arts) he joined Lenny Kravitz’ band.
 

Across that time, three Trombone Shorty albums and many collaborations since, Andrews nurtured a voracious appetite for all types of music—a phenomenon on fluid display with Parking Lot Symphony. On “Familiar,” co-written by Aloe Blacc, they practically mint a new genre (trap-funk?) while Andrews channels his inner R. Kelly to spit game at an old flame. Meanwhile, the instrumental “Tripped Out Slim” (the nickname of a family friend who recently passed) bends echoes of the Pink Panther theme into something fit for James Brown to strut to. And if you listen closely to “Where It At?,” written with Better Than Ezra’s Kevin Griffin, you may even hear a little Y2K pop. “I know it wasn’t cool to listen to *NSYNC or Britney Spears in high school,” says Andrews, “but those bass lines and melodies are funky.” They pair astonishingly well with all the Earth, Wind & Fire that bubbles beneath these songs.
 

It’s worth noting that Andrews’ vocals sound better than ever (he credits Seefried for that), because Parking Lot Symphony might be the man’s most heartfelt offering yet. The breezy title track, which Andrews wrote with Alex Ebert (Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros), is as much about walking the Tremé, being uplifted by the music that seems to seep from every surface, as it is about moving on from a broken heart. And the shuffling, bluesy “No Good Time” reminds us, with a world-weary smile, that “nobody never learned nothin’ from no good time.”
 

But Andrews is clear that this isn’t some kind of breakup record. “It’s a life record,” he says, “about prevailing no matter what type of roadblock is in front of you.” That message is clearest on “Dirty Water,” where over an easy groove, Andrews adopts a soft falsetto to address just about anyone going through it—personal, political, whatever. “There’s a lot of hope turning to doubt,” he coos. “I’ve got something to say to them / You don’t know what you’re talking about / When you believe in love, it all works out.” Amen. Now let the horns play us out.
 

www.tromboneshorty.com

Raye Zaragoza

Raye Zaragoza

 

“…one of the most politically relevant artists in her genre” – Paste Magazine

 

“One of the most affecting protest songs of the century” – WhatCulture

 

Raye Zaragoza is an award-winning singer-songwriter who carries an acoustic guitar and a message. Her quiet yet powerful song “In the River,” written in response to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota, resonated strongly with listeners and went viral in late 2016, garnering half a million views on the video, national media coverage, and a Global Music Award and Honesty Oscar.

 

 

Raye’s debut album, Fight For You (independent, 2017), displays her compassion, dedication to justice and equality for all, and keen eye for the seemingly small daily moments that become our most meaningful memories. About the record, Raye says, “This album is about finding yourself and finding your voice. It’s about maturing and realizing that you can make a difference if you so choose.”

 

Writing about social issues comes naturally to Raye. “As a woman of color in America, social issues are things you deal with and see every day of your life,” she says. “I write about my experience and oftentimes my existence has been laced with injustice.”

 

Raye performs her music all over the United States as well as across Europe, where she spent five weeks touring in summer 2017. Her music has been featured on Billboard and Democracy Now! and on numerous lists of the best modern-day protest songs, including those by Paste Magazine, What Culture, and Overblown. She has also performed live sessions for Paste, Daytrotter, and FNX.

 

 

At SXSW 2018, Raye spoke about her loyal fanbase and maintaining an independent career on a panel entitled “Serving the Sacred Bond” hosted by PledgeMusic. This summer, she joined Dispatch and Nahko and Medicine for the People on their Summer Tour, which included dates at Red Rocks and two nights at Central Park Summerstage.

 

www.rayezaragoza.com

Delhi 2 Dublin

Delhi 2 Dublin

“Delhi 2 Dublin is the United Nations of rock ‘n’ roll.” – Hour Magazine

 

“Famed for its incendiary live show, the multi-culti, genre-bending five-some has been playing white-hot gigs the world over” – Uptown Mag

 

“The Vancouver-based collective combines dhol, fiddle and breakbeats in an Irish/ Asian stew that is surprisingly varied, a marvelously wide-ranging and free-thinking concept.” — BBC

 

“The fans couldn’t get enough of their fusion style that is part Bollywood wedding, part Celtic kitchen party, and all electronic dance fest.”— The Snipe

 

“Mainstream DJ party animals with an epic sound that deserves to be cranked proudly with the windows down.” – Stylus Magazine

 

“The Vancouver-based, border-bending unit has earned every accolade and ovation they’ve ever received by targeting our primal need to move to the groove.” – Worldbeat International


Delhi 2 Dublin are a Vancouver based band that plays an energetic mash-up of Bhangra, Celtic, Dub Reggae and Electronica with global rhythms and club beats.

 

 

Nurtured by equal parts raucous underground bass parties and all ages folk festivals, Delhi 2 Dublin ’s always distinctive sound has evolved over the past decade into its own decisive genre, styled, “Subcontinental Pop”—a name that conveys both its deep South Asian roots and its expansive, crazy-fun appeal. The beautifully supercharged complexity of their sound flows from high-level folk and alternative-pop, blended and delivered across an array of acoustic instruments—dhol, tabla, violin, guitar—and electronic beats – and immersed in smart, heavy, sometimes gritty, and almost invariably joyful beats.

 

Averaging 100 shows a year in places ranging from Canadian and U.S. clubs to Glastonbury and Burning Man to performing for over 100,000 people at Canada Day celebrations, Delhi 2 Dublin have the gift of connecting with masses of people, pulverizing their inhibitions, and getting them moving.

 

 

In recent years, Delhi 2 Dublin ’s has been honing their songwriting skills, which is most evident on their upcoming album, We Got This. The album was produced by Toronto hitmaker Gavin Brown (Barenaked Ladies, Metric, Tragically Hip) , who helped them harness their socially conscious sensibilities and awareness of their place in the world into making their most personal and meaningful collection of songs to-date.

 

With tracks like “My People,” “Home (Everywhere I Go)” and the title track, “We Got This,” Delhi 2 Dublin is speaking directly to their experiences as “brown people” in society and how that translates to people of all of colors and backgrounds. For their first time as a band, the members of Delhi 2 Dublin feel as though they’ve been able to pull together everything they’ve been through and put it into a collection of songs that that will reach everyone, while also leaving people thinking as they’re dancing and singing along.

 

www.delhi2dublin.com
https://www.facebook.com/delhi2dublin/

Con Brio

Con Brio

“Quite simply, no one the first weekend of Austin City Limits Festival touched them. …Con Brio churned out the set that renewed your faith in post-millennial American music.” – Pop Matters

 

Named for an Italian musical direction meaning with spirit, Con Brio is a San Francisco Bay Area seven-piece that plays energetic soul, psych-rock and R&B that’s as fresh and freethinking as the place they call home. With singer Ziek McCarter channeling “the pained emotion of Otis Redding, the suave edge of Sam Cooke and the solid dance moves, splits and all, of James Brown” (KQED) and a tight, veteran band that “comes across like a party punk version of Sly and the Family Stone” (Consequence of Sound), Con Brio is known to convert anyone who sees their electric live show.

 

 

Their latest recording, Explorer, builds on the success of Con Brio’s critically acclaimed debut LP Paradise while introducing a newly polished, modern sound for the band. It’s also a travelogue of sorts, a reflection on two years of nearly nonstop touring, with all its joys and sacrifices.

 

In recent years, the band has toured with the Revivalists, Galactic, and Grace Potter, among others, and played Bonnaroo, Outside Lands, Lollapalooza, Bumbershoot, Austin City Limits, Japan’s Fuji Rock, the Montreal Jazz Festival, and the Netherlands’ North Sea Jazz Festival, to name just a few.

 

 

Having proved themselves on an international stage, Con Brio breaks new ground on Explorer, expanding beyond raw energy and retro sounds toward a layered contemporary production style, all delivered with road-tested confidence. It’s a big record and a joyful one, taking on self-determination, sex and relationships, the complexities of being an American band traveling the world in the year 2018 — and ultimately finding the things that divide us don’t stand a chance on the dance floor.

 

www.thebandconbrio.com
www.facebook.com/thebandconbrio
www.instagram.com/thebandconbrio

Ayla Nereo

Ayla Nereo

“[Ayla’s] relationship with the earth is imprinted in her music… expansive and intriguing.” – Billboard

 

Ayla Nereo is a voice for the planet, a beacon of light, a modern bard of beauty singing directly from her soul. With poetry splashing like dazzling paint across a canvas of sound, Ayla builds layer upon layer of vocal melodies into majestic loop-pedal harmonies, weaving syncopated threads of guitar, kalimba, piano, and percussion into her live performances.

 

 

Calling us to listen deeper, her songs are elegant masterpieces of lucid storytelling, with lyrics ringing as anthems, riddles, and mantras for hope, healing, and love. With an uncanny ability to disarm and crack open the heart, Ayla sings for the depth of our humanness, for a truth beyond time and place, and for the pure wonder of life itself.

 

 

Raised on Bob Dylan, opera, classical music, and ABBA, Ayla’s music touches both the timeless and modern. Vocally and lyrically often compared to Joni Mitchell, her arrangements and stage presence lean into something more modern and fierce, an authenticity and innocence closer to Aurora or Imogen Heap. Dancing her own songs on stage as she sings them, her movement and presence gives the audience a permission to be wild, real, vulnerable, and alive.

 

 

Though Ayla’s vocal melodies, timeless lyrics, and fingerpicking guitar songs harken back to an earlier era, she always rides the line between genres, weaving in live vocal looping, beats and percussion, orchestral string arrangements, celtic melodies, and even dashes of hip-hop wordplay, so that her songwriting and sound ultimately cannot be compared to anyone else.
Every performance Ayla gives is its own inspired journey; an enchanting and poignant experience that holds you by the heart and doesn’t let go.

 

www.aylanereo.com

www.facebook.com/ayla.nereo.music

ARCHIVE – 2017 RV Camping with Hook-Ups

RV CAMPING WITH HOOK-UPS

RV Hookup Parking opens at 8:00AM on Thursday, July 12 and your spot is available to you until noon on Monday, July 16.
RV Hookup site purchases are available in packets only including two Adult 4-Day Festival Ticket with camping.
RV’s are welcome to dry camp without hookups, as well.  No Generators allowed.

Click HERE to purchase your RV site with hookups.

worldfest-rv-sitemap2017-1
worldfest-rv-sitemap2017-2
RV Hookup Parking opens at 8:00AM on Thursday, July 12 and your spot is available to you until noon on Monday, July 16.
RV Hookup site purchases are available in packets only including two Adult 4-Day Festival Ticket with camping.
RV’s are welcome to dry camp without hookups, as well.  No Generators allowed.

Click HERE to purchase your RV site with hookups.