Global Indigenous Peoples Village

Global Indigenous Peoples Village

The Global Village has its own stage dedicated to Indigenous People’s music and dance with workshops and a marketplace showcasing crafts, food and entertainment to encourage cultural exchange and awareness.

 

WorldFest acknowledges the indigenous people upon whose lands we hold WorldFest, the Nisenan Tribe. The Nisenan Tribe will open WorldFest and welcome guests this year as we celebrate within their ancestral homelands.

 

Global Indigenous Peoples Village at the California Worldfest

Join us next week, July 13-16th, in Grass Valley for the Global Indigenous Peoples Village at the 21st Annual California WorldFest. Come dance & sing, browse handmade art & crafts, listen to stories, and more. See you there! #MusicConnectsUsAll #caWorldfest

Special thanks to the organizers and staff at the Worldfest for putting on such a great event as well as Mignon Geli and Anna Kastner for their efforts coordinating the Village.

Video filmed & edited by Trenton T Branson.

Posted by Trenton Branson Photography on Thursday, July 6, 2017

 

PERFORMERS

Bear Fox & Kontiwennenhawi
Calle Placer
Feather River Singers
Huayllipacha
Keith Secola
Kimberly ShiningStar
Little Thunder
Martha Redbone Roots Project
Nash Tavewa
Neena McNair Family Singers
Pamyua of Alaska
Percy “War Cloud” Edwards and Red Circle
Raye Zaragoza
Southern California Mexica Dancers
Supaman
7th Generation Rise
Xiuhtezcatl & Isa

 

VENDORS

Buffalo Field Campaign
Hempstead Project Heart
Mayan Tree Handicrafts
Rose Wood
Sierra Native Alliance
Timoteo Ikoshy Montoya
Vince & Jodi Castanon


Bear Fox & Kontiwennenhawi

The Ahkwesasne Women Singers were formed in 1999 by four inspired, and inspiring women; Bear Fox, Katsitsionni Fox, Elizabeth Nanitcoke and Iawentas Nanticoke. They were driven by the need to protect and preserve the Kanienkeha (Mohawk Language), traditional Kanienkeha:ka (Mohawk People) customs and stories, as well as the oral traditions that are passed down from grandmother to grand-daughter. They believe that songs are the easiest way to pass on language and culture to future generations. Blessed with beautiful singing voices, the women put their talents and their messages together to form a group that would write and perform traditional Kanienkeha:ka songs.  Since their inception, the Ahkwesahsne Women Singers have brought their beautiful and powerful music to the community of Ahkwesasne.

Members of group are in various stages of life – grandmothers, mothers, aunts, daughters, sisters and cousins. They are teachers, environmental researchers, social workers and students. They take time out of their personal and professional lives to assist their community and volunteer for fundraising activities.

Aside from singing Haudenosaunee social songs, some members of Kontiwennenhawi are song writers.  They work with Elders and fluent speakers from Ahkwesahsne to ensure the correct usage and spelling of words. The songs contain their own messages that they believe are important for the Mohawk people to know and remember. Their songs honor our Elders, Kanienkehaka teachers, Mother Earth, Grandmother Moon, and Grandfather Thunder. Kontiwennenhawi is committed to continuing the traditions of our ancestors and preserving our language and culture through their beautiful songs and inspiring efforts.

 


Calle Placer

Calle Placer is a multidimensional phenomenon of Latin fusion founded in East L.A. playing  jazz, salsa, funk, reggae and rock.  Their neighborhood of Pleasant Ave. offered them the freedom to jam anytime, day or night.

Vocalist Melody Betancort says, “One day it might be salsa, one day it might be funk, another day might be reggae or jazz.   We fuse musical styles and experiences to create a pleasant sound, a pleasant feeling, a pleasant time.  Wherever we go we carry that essence of Pleasant Ave with us – listening to the mariachis rehearse during the day as the birds sing along with them.  It’s a street where we can rehearse and the neighbors are pleasant because its known that musicians live here.”

 

www.facebook.com/Calle-Placer-104311412972847

 


Xiuhtezcatl & Isa

Xiuhtezcatl and Isa are Earth Guardians – conscious hip-hop artists and activists who write and produce music to tell the stories of the movements and issues facing the world from the perspective of young ambitious musicians.

This music brings movements to the masses, written to inspire people to pursue their passions, and use art as a form of resistance to create change, battle oppression, bring people together and tell our stories.  They have spoken and performed in the United Nations and at events, colleges, conferences, and music festivals worldwide.

 

www.earthguardians.org

 


Feather River Singers

Feather River Singers is a Women’s Drum with exciting energy, a soothing beat and songs in Cherokee and English. Dedicated to preserving native language through songs, all original materials by group members their 2005 debut CD “Daughters of the Earth” by Feather River Singers broke into new musical territory. The group received a nomination in 2006 for Debut Artist of the Year by the Native American Music Awards (NAMMYS). Current members are Kathleen Shain, Anna Eyre, Pamela Ames, all born in California.

 

https://www.facebook.com/Feather-River-Singers-144896795603827/

 


Huayllipacha

Huayllipacha (pronounced Why-Lee-Pacha) a group conceived in 1987 by several Peruvian youths from the Andes. As a tribute to their culture and with respect, honor, and admiration of their ancestors, the meaning of their name is “Singing to the Earth,” and it is in this spirit that their music is offered.

Over the years, as the group evolved, they have expanded their style honoring both traditional and contemporary music of the Andes, as well as from other regions in South America. Embracing all these styles, the music of Huayllipacha will always come from their heart and Soul, to share with the people of the Earth. Truly a cultural treasure, it is said, “one listen to these world- class Andean musicians will sweep you away to the Peruvian highlands.”

 

www.musicoftheandes.com
www.facebook.com/Huayllipacha

 


Keith Secola

“…blues, rock, swing, folk, country, pop, Latin and Native influences into a politically charged tapestry leavened with Secola’s sly wit.” – Native Peoples Magazine

Keith Secola is an icon and ambassador of Native music. He is one of the most influential artists in the field today. Rising from the grassroots of North America, he is a songwriter of the people. Critics have dubbed him as the Native versions of both Neil Young and Bruce Springsteen.

NDN Kars (Indian cars), his most popular song is considered the contemporary Native American anthem, achieving legendary status and earning him a well deserved cult following. It has been the number one requested song on tribal radio since the 1992. In 2011, he joined the ranks of Jimmy Hendrix, Hank Williams, Crystal Gale, and Richie Valens, and was inducted into the Native Music Hall of Fame.

 

www.secola.com

 


Kimberly ShiningStar

There was a time when stories told the history of the land, the plants, and the animals. Kimberly ShiningStar will bring that culture to life, sharing her Traditional Native Stories, some of which have been handed down for thousands of years.

Kimberly ShiningStar is Tume’lay Nissenan Miwok, a California Indian. She has been sharing the Indigenous Culture of her people since 1999 with thousands of people every year and is very excited to share her stories at WorldFest.

 

 

 


Little Thunder

Cheryl Angel is a member of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate or Rosebud Sioux Tribe of South Dakota. A front line opponent of the pipelines threatening native homelands across America, Cheryl is a strong advocate for environmental justice and indigenous rights. She spent the recent fall-winter season at the Sacred Stone Camp of Standing Rock and will share her experiences within the soothing ambiance of a Lakota wacipi (dance).

Karen K Little Thunder is also a member of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate. She is a proud graduate of Sinte Gleska University and a descendant of the University’s namesake and historical Sicangu leader, Spotted Tail. As a bloodline descendant of Little Thunder, Spotted Tail, and Crow Dog, Karen is helpful to the continuation of Sicangu Lakota ancestral knowledge and language by sharing her personal experiences in growth, recovery, and cultural reparations.

Cheryl and Karen are traditional dancers of the Sicangu Lakota wacipi and each speaks from the heart in defense of their homelands and indigenous rights. They are mothers and grandmothers, earth protectors and maske (sister-friends), who live and breathe their ancestral responsibilities on a daily basis. Join them in celebrating Mni Wiconi and their continuing advocacy for environmental justice. Revel in the Circle of Life and hear from these vibrant Lakota winyan (women) the latest about the #NoDAPL and #NoKXL movements of the Great Plains region. Water is Life. MNI WICONI.

 

https://www.facebook.com/N8ivGipZ
www.facebook.com/karen.k.littlethunder

 


Martha Redbone Roots Project

“Redbone combines folk, Appalachian, soul and Native tradition in a group of settings of poetry by William Blake — a startling idea, perhaps, but one that brims with potency and freshness.” – NPR

Martha Redbone’s music flows equally from her own unique, award-winning blend of Native American elements with funk and her deep roots in Appalachian folk and Piedmont blues favored by the matriarchy that raised her on a rich sojourn from Clinch Mountain, Virginia to Harlan County, Kentucky and beyond to Brooklyn’s Dodge City-esque mean streets.

Redbone, since the establishment of her career in London and New York City, has humbly and steadfastly earned a solid reputation as a sought-after collaborator – whether in the guise of Warner Chappell-minted songwriter, behind the console guide or earnest guest voice — amongst her peers. Mentored by Ohio Players/P-Funk mentor Walter “Junie” Morrison, she and UK- bred partner Aaron Whitby consistently provide essential direction and soulful support to knit track and artist into an indelible whole. Redbone’s latest music resonates with the influence of southeastern raisin’, echoing an earlier time/space through elements of folk, country gospel, stomp chants, and the high lonesome of a front porch Sunday pickin’.

 

www.sroartists.com/artists/martharedbone
www.facebook.com/Martha-Redbone-474870425872870
@martharedbone

 


Nash Tavewa

Nash Tavewa is a talented artist that uses his skills as a native flute and drum maker to hand-craft beautiful instruments and to create soulful music that honors his ancient Bene Walash (Zapotec) heritage of Oaxaca, Mexico.

Nash’s musical journey began as a child, when his parents, masters of traditional Zapotec pottery & clay instruments, made him small cane flutes and clay whistles to play with while herding goats. Surrounded by family artists and musicians, Nash soon learned to create his own instruments, while playing the traditional song of his ancestors “The Cloud People”.

In 2003, after several years of apprenticeship, Nash began to create his own Pre-Columbian clay instruments, Drums and Lakota style love flutes, native to Turtle Island (the Americas).

Nash speaks 3 languages. He has great appreciation for his native cultural heritage, with its rich traditions, ceremonies, and music. He is determine to help preserve his native tongue and keep the traditional ways alive.

Nash Tavewa sells his instruments and recordings globally.

 

www.flutesbynash.com

 


Neena McNair Family Singers

Neena McNair Family Singers originally came together as a women’s drum group to deepen and strengthen our commitment to maintain a pure dedication to the healing that comes through the drum, for all living things.

They offer themselves as a conduit for the songs, in order to share and educate others in the nature way. Striving to maintain integrity throughout, always with the deepest respect, their intention is to preserve each song’s unique message and sound, so the songs will not be forgotten and people will be reminded of the sometimes invisible healing magic that binds all living things together.


Pamyua of Alaska

“The most famous Inuit band in the world.” – Rolling Stone

“One of the 10 greatest Alaska artists of the millennium.” – Alaska Magazine

“A Blizzard of interlocking harmonies.” – Native People Magazine

Many Americans were introduced to Inuit music watching the Canadian epic The Fast Runner, but for more than a decade Pamyua has released traditional Inuit (Yup’ik) Drumsongs from Alaska with a distinct and unique American sound.

Because some of their music is a combination or Yup’ik lyrics combined with a modern sound, they are popular with the youth culture as well, as reflected in some of the videos on their website. Pamyua’s music was featured on the Discovery Channel’s Flying Wild Alaska and in numerous films. From Queen Margrethe II of Denmark to Secretary of State John Kerry, the group has entertained thousands with their fusion of traditional Inuit music and Yup’ik dance performance.

 

www.pamyua.com


Red Circle

Red Circle is a Native American Dance group that was formed 8 years ago for the sole purpose of educating the public on Native American Dancing. Leonard and Tangerine Robles the founders formed the group because he wanted their adopted children to learn their heritage since all 6 kids are Native Americans by birth.

Percy “War Cloud” Edwards of the Colville Confederated tribes (Arrow Lake, Nez Perce) joined the group since he was already performing at schools, and special events throughout California. Percy Edwards was born and raised on the reservation with tribal member numbering over 10,000. Percy attended St. Mary’s Mission Indian Boarding School from K-8th grade then transferred to Chemawa Indian High School in Salem Oregon.

Past performances include Old Sacramento Gold Rush Days, Presidents Day Event Mt Vernon Memorial
California State Museum Sacramento, Stockton Cinco De Mayo parade, Lodi’s Street fair, Georgetown Flute Festival, Dept of Justice Sacramento, Vacaville Prison and Travis Air Force Base.

 


Raye Zaragoza

“While initially recognizable, Raye’s voice—and music, at large—has a unique elusiveness.” – Deli Magazine

Raye Zaragoza is a Native-American(Pima)/Taiwanese singer-songwriter who was born and raised in Manhattan, New York. At the age of fourteen, she moved across the country to Los Angeles and has since continuously been on the move touring and sharing her music with people of all walks of life. She has performed in more than twenty states on the East and West Coasts as well as Mexico, Canada and France.

The Fox and King calls her, “your new favorite singer-songwriter” and “seasoned, technical, classic, and effortless all at the same time.” The Deli compares her music to that of Norah Jones, and says “Raye’s voice-and music, at large-has a unique elusiveness.”

Her debut EP entitled Heroine was recorded at Red Bull Studios in New York City with Chris Tabron (credits include Beyoncé, Robin Thicke, Mobb Deep, Vacationer, Natalia Kills…) and was released on May 11, 2015. The title single Heroine has received acclaim across the United States and in the United Kingdom.

 

www.rayezmusic.com

 


Southern California Mexica Dancers

The Southern California Mexica Dancers (meshika) share the traditions of theri ancestors – the Mexica people from the Central Valley of Mexico once known as the great Tenochtitlan.

Their Danzas (way of dance) communicates stories and observations of the cosmic and the natural world. During their ceremony participants are invited to join in prayer for healing and restoration.

The dancers include Bernice Vasquez and Xochitl Palomera.

 


Supaman

“In southeast Montana, thousands of miles from the birthplace of hip-hop, a man with the given name Christian Parrish Takes the Gun has been rapping to young people on the Crow Nation reservation. He calls himself Supaman, and he’s been merging inner-city music with more local concerns for more than a dozen years.” – NPR

As a member of the “Apsaalooke Nation”, Supaman makes his home on the Crow reservation in Montana. “Supaman” is Christian Takes Gun Parrish, a Native American dancer and innovative hip-hop artist who has dedicated his life to empowering and spreading a message of hope through culture and music.

He has been the recipient of the Nammy “Native American Music Award”, “North American Indigenous Image Award”, and 7 “Tunney Awards”. He recently was awarded The Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Award in Canada for best video and was voted MTV’s new Artist of the Week.

His latest videos titled “Prayer Loop Song” and “Why” both have gone viral and have received over 2 million views on Youtube and Facebook which has put him in high demand touring extensively throughout the U.S.A and internationally. He has performed for Google at the Google headquarters in San Francisco and got to dance in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade in New York City. He recently was asked to audition for America’s Got Talent and the Broadway play Hamilton.

 

www.facebook.com/Supamanhiphop

 


7th Generation Rise

7th Generation Rise is a self-described “Indigenous Soul” band, combining modern rock, reggae, funk, and hip hop with traditional drums, flute, and native chants. Their message is one of spiritual unity and honoring cultural diversity, as their lyrics express a much needed collective awareness of who we are as a whole and what needs to happen in order for the next 7 generations to have a future on our Mother Earth who is crying for a paradigm shift.

7th Generation Rise has been an active voice for the last genetically pure, free roaming buffalo in Yellowstone for 14 years , as the buffalo have been being slaughtered by the Department of Livestock , and many other inter agencies. This year’s Global Indigenous People’s Village line up of the Band will consist of Goodshield Aguilar on guitar and vocals, Mignon Geli on Native flutes and Johnnie Martinez on drums and vocals.

Listen to and buy 7th Generation Rise music on CD Baby, the independent record store by musicians for musicians.

 

www.cdbaby.com/Artist/7thGenerationRise
www.goodshieldmusic.com
www.buffalofieldcampaign.org

 


VENDORS


Buffalo Field Campaign

The Buffalo Field Campaign (BFC) is the only group working in the field, everyday, to stop the slaughter and harassment of Yellowstone’s wild buffalo. Volunteers from around the world defend buffalo on their traditional winter habitat and advocate for their protection. Our daily patrols stand with the buffalo on the ground they choose to be on, and document every move made against them.

 

www.buffalofieldcampaign.org

 


Hempstead Project Heart

Hempstead Project Heart (Hemp Energies Alternative Resource Technologies) is dedicated to raising awareness about the environmental, social, and economic benefits of restoring industrial hemp in America. Since 2012, we have partnered with communities, farmers, musicians, green builders, entrepreneurs, students and sustainability organizations across the country to support hemp initiatives, build a hemp green economy and elevate public consciousness about the urgency to return hemp farming to our state and nation. John Trudell is the co-founder of Hempstead Project Heart with Willie Nelson. HPH is a 501 (c)3 Project of Earth Island Institute.

 

www.hempsteadprojectheart.org

 


Mayan Tree Handicrafts

Mayan Tree Handicrafts aims to promote handicrafts made by the indigenous Maya peoples from Guatemala. It started with family members who make the beaded guitar straps and shoes with traditional handwoven fabrics.

Mayan Tree Handicrafts has since expanded to help other indigenous artists promote their creative works. The goal is to raise profits to provide Guatemalans with limited access to schools an opportunity to attend classes in computer skills and general tutoring.

Come by and chat with us about the needs of indigenous Maya and how you might support with education.

 

www.etsy.com/people/mayantreehandicrafts
www.facebook.com/pg/Mayan-Tree-Handicrafts-300294036743698/

 


Rose Wood

Rose Wood says “Worldfest has been an exciting venue that I have participated in for the past 5 years. I have been an active supporter of Native American culture here in Nevada County as well as with tribal groups in Nevada, Arizona, and Hawaii. Before my retirement in 2010, I worked extensively with tribes in Health and Human services for twenty plus years.

“I am of Native American heritage; Hawaiian, Mexican, and tribal member of the Ko-ta-bah Miwok tribe from El Dorado County, California. I’ve lived and supported tribal families in Nevada County since moving here in 1999.

“Since my retirement in 2010, I’ve created RoseCraft, etc., a small business which I share with my daughter. We create beautiful handcrafted soaps, lotions, and jewelry. I am an advocate and supporter of Hemp products which we use in some of our soaps and lotions. We will be displaying Hemp products as well, with current information on Hemp legislature. Our jewelry is eclectic ranging from prayer beads, bracelets, necklaces to Tree of Life motif.”

 

www.facebook.com/AlohaGirl01

 


Sierra Native Alliance

The Sierra Native Alliance was formed in 2007 by a group of Native community members dedicated to the preservation of Native families, cultures, and environments. Incorporating as a non-profit organization in 2009, the Sierra Native Alliance provides cultural education, family resources and environmental preservation activities in the Sierra Nevada Foothills region.

Community Empowerment: working together to strengthen leadership skills and resources for families and communities of the Sierra Nevada Foothills.

Cross-Cultural Awareness: building relationships across cultures, tribal groups and communities to raise awareness of indigenous cultures and environments.

Intergenerational Sharing: bringing our youth and elders together to promote extended family relationships and intergenerational education opportunities.

Activity-based Learning: teaching traditional knowledge, values and ways of thinking through hands-on cultural education and environmental activities.

 

www.sierranativealliance.org

 


Timoteo Ikoshy Montoya

Timoteo Ikoshy Montoya was born in Corpus Christi,Texas in 1956. When he was nine his family moved to San Francisco, California. His artistic abilities have been with him since his youth. As he made his way through school, his creativity was encouraged by his family and instructors. He remembers, “When I was growing up in Texas and later in California, my older brother and I spent a lot of time drawing and creating. Our family didn¹t spend time on emphasizing our “Indianess”. The Indian people in our family was common knowledge just as it was with many Tejano families. It seemed that we were just trying to survive and make a place for ourselves just like the rest of America.”

He lived in the San Francisco bay area until his move up to Humboldt County where he attended College of the Redwoods. It was there when he entered the Native American Studies Program and began his involvement with other native peoples in securing their culture and history. He remembers an elder Lakota brother referring to it as becoming a Born Agin¹ Savage. “It was at this time that I fully understood how much the Indian part of our family was a very important part of the foundation of my own life.”

He also began to paint using acrylics, his work making the most of ideas and inspiration from the native environment he was in. His art, from it¹s inception, represents the evolution of immersion in native teachings as it traced it’s way through ceremonies and the everyday part of his own personal life. Ikoshy has never had any formal art training. ” I was born with my artistic abilities and my elders, the sweat lodge and related ceremonies have been my art instructors”, he states.

Ikoshy is an enrolled member of the Lipan Apache Band of Texas. He currently lives in the community of Yankee Hill, California. His art has been featured in documentary videos on Native America, in various periodicals, on book covers, CD jackets and cassettes.

 

www.ikoshy.com

 


Vince & Jodi Castanon

We have traveled the western states selling our finished crafts and craft supplies at Native American Powwows, mountain man rendezvous and craft shows. For the past 16 years we have been showing kids how to carve using soapstone. We quickly learned how to make carving kits that beginners could use their first try.

The most important part of our kits is the soapstone. The soapstone we use is from Oregon and California and is asbestos free. Soapstone was used by all the California tribes in their daily life and by many other tribes throughout the United States. Native Americans used soapstone for making smoking pipes because it does not crack when hot. Soapstone was also used for carvings, beads and amulets. Talc powder from soapstone is the same powder we use today. Soapstone can be heated red hot and used for cooking stones, and in fact Native Americans would cook directly on flat pieces placed on hot coals. A favorite use was heating soapstone and burying under a thin layer of dirt to warm ones bed at night. Other uses were for tools such as scrappers, arrow straighteners, and weights.

My carving kits are used at four California state Indian museums as teaching aids and for resale at the gift shops You may find our kits and products at Big Trees in Arnold, California, Grinding Rock State Park in Volcano, California, California State Indian Museum in Sacramento, and Yosemite National Park’s Indian Museum. My soapstone carving kits are also used by the Los Angeles county department of education and the Indian educational programs. I have been attending the Indian Teachers Conferences for the past 4 years and have placed my kits in many California schools. I have also organized the craft program for 75 kids who take part in Indian Summer Camp held at Silverlake, California for the past 4 years.
Timoteo Ikoshy Montoya

Timoteo Ikoshy Montoya was born in Corpus Christi,Texas in 1956. When he was nine his family moved to San Francisco, California. His artistic abilities have been with him since his youth. As he made his way through school, his creativity was encouraged by his family and instructors. He remembers, “When I was growing up in Texas and later in California, my older brother and I spent a lot of time drawing and creating. Our family didn¹t spend time on emphasizing our “Indianess”. The Indian people in our family was common knowledge just as it was with many Tejano families. It seemed that we were just trying to survive and make a place for ourselves just like the rest of America.”

He lived in the San Francisco bay area until his move up to Humboldt County where he attended College of the Redwoods. It was there when he entered the Native American Studies Program and began his involvement with other native peoples in securing their culture and history. He remembers an elder Lakota brother referring to it as becoming a Born Agin¹ Savage. “It was at this time that I fully understood how much the Indian part of our family was a very important part of the foundation of my own life.”

He also began to paint using acrylics, his work making the most of ideas and inspiration from the native environment he was in. His art, from it¹s inception, represents the evolution of immersion in native teachings as it traced it¹s way through ceremonies and the everyday part of his own personal life. Ikoshy has never had any formal art training. ” I was born with my artistic abilities and my elders, the sweat lodge and related ceremonies have been my art instructors”, he states.
Ikoshy is an enrolled member of the Lipan Apache Band of Texas. He currently lives in the community of Yankee Hill, California with his wife, Nadine and two children, Raina and Teo. His art has been featured in documentary videos on Native America, in various periodicals, on book covers, CD jackets and cassettes.

 

www.mountainpipes.com